Acquisitions & Accessions / Deaccessions & Disposals

The legal acquisition and accession of objects into your collections is a sign of a healthy and active institution. But what are the proper methods of acquiring objects and what kind of documentation do you need in order to prove legal title? As your institution continues to collect objects, the issue of legally removing and disposing of objects may also arise. In this module, you will learn how museums, archives/special collections, and institutions with living collections handle this foundational part of a collections policy.  

Webinar
Acquisitions & Accessions and Deaccessions & Disposals from the Museum Point-of-View webinar is presented by Linda Deaton, Chief Curator, Tallahassee Museum. 
Archives/Special Collections Point-of-View is presented by Dean DeBolt, University Librarian, Special Collections and West Florida Archives, John C. Pace Library, University of West Florida. 
Living Collections Point-of-View was developed by Dr. Larry Killmar, Vice President of Animal Science and Conservation, Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo, and is presented by Robin Bauer Kilgo, Program Associate, Florida Connecting to Collections.  

Webinar Length: 44 min. 52 sec.
Note: When viewing the webinar, a new browser page will open.

Activity
Discussion Question about Acquisition: Institutions acquire objects through many different methods. Some of the most common include donations, purchases, bequests, or exchanges. In some cases, institutions also acquire objects through active field collection or repository agreements. What methodologies does your institution use to acquire new objects? Are all of the methods you use to acquire objects discussed in your collections management/development policy? If not, what clarifications should you add?

Worksheet for Accession Criteria: A separate worksheet has been developed for this activity. 
Note: When viewing the worksheet, a new browser page will open.

Discussion Question about Disposal: Proper and ethical disposal of items from your collection can occur in different ways. The most common methods include transfer to an appropriate organization, exchange, repatriation, return to donor, and in some cases, public sale. In the museum field, and for some archival institutions, all deaccessions should be governed by a deaccession policy and process formally approved by the governing authority. Does your institution have a formal policy regarding disposal? If so, which methods do you use? If not, which methods do you think would be most applicable to your institution and why? Why do you need, or not need, to include deaccession and disposal in your policy?

Worksheet for Deaccession Criteria: A separate worksheet has been developed for this activity. 
Note: When viewing the worksheet, a new browser page will open.

Samples
Boynton Beach City Library Archives - Aquisition (.pdf)

Boynton Beach City Library Archives - De-Selection (.pdf)

Museum of Science & History of Jacksonville (MOSH) - Living Collections Management Acquisitions & Accessions and Deaccessions & Disposal (.pdf) 

Museum of Science & History of Jacksonville (MOSH) - Non-Living Collections Management Acquisitions & Accessions and Deaccessions & Disposal (.pdf) 

Stranahan House - Acqusitions & Accessions (.pdf)

Stranahan House - Deaccessions & Disposal (.pdf)

Tallahassee Museum - Non-Living Collections Acquisitions & Accessions (.pdf)

Tallahassee Museum - Non-Living Collections Deaccessions & Disposal (.pdf) 

Tallahssee Museum -  Living Collections Acquistions & Accessions and Deaccessions & Disposal (.pdf) 
Note:  When viewing the samples a new browser page will open.  

Online Resources
Texas State Library and Archives Commission, CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries
https://www.tsl.texas.gov/sites/default/files/public/tslac/ld/ld/pubs/crew/crewmethod12.pdf

National Park Service (NPS), Museum Handbook, Part 2a: Museum Records, Chapter 2: Accessioning
http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/MHII/mh2ch2firstfile.pdf

National Park Service (NPS), Museum Handbook, Part 2a: Museum Records, Chapter 6: Deaccessioning
http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/MHII/mh2ch6.pdf

University of Alaska Museum of the North, Acquisitions & Accessioning Policy
http://www.uaf.edu/museum/collections/ethno/policies/acquisitions/

Society of American Archivists, A Guide to Deeds of Gift
http://www.archivists.org/publications/deed_of_gift.asp 

Society of American Archivists, Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning
http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/GuidelinesForReappraisalAndDeaccessioning-May2012.pdf

Speaker Biography
Linda Deaton serves as the Chief Curator of Collections and Exhibits for the Tallahassee Museum, and has been associated with the museum for 29 years. She participated in the American Alliance of Museums and the National Museum of American History Collections Planning Colloquium, and served as a mentor for the Florida Connecting to Collections Disaster Preparedness grant. Ms. Deaton has a BS in Studio Art and a MLS, both from Florida State University. She is a graduate of the Seminar for Historical Administration.

Dean DeBolt is the University Archivist and Librarian at the University Archives and West Florida History Center, University of West Florida. There he is responsible for a sizeable collection that includes rare books, maps, manuscripts, photographs, and paintings. Dean is also Adjunct Professor in the History Department where he teaches Archives Administration and Management. He holds a MA in Library Science from University of Illinois, and a MA in History from Sangamon State University. He also received an Archives Certificate from Ohio Historical Society.

Larry Killmar has traveled extensively around the world, during which time he visited over 200 zoos. He is now the Vice President of Animal Science and Conservation at Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo, and an Affiliate Professor with George Mason University. Larry was recently elected President of the Florida Association of Zoos and Aquariums. He was previously the Deputy Director of Collections for the Zoological Society of San Diego, where he was employed for 36 years and managed one of the largest and most diverse collections in a zoological garden.

© 2017 Florida Association of Museums // Site Map // Board Member Login // Media